The Unintended Consequences of Public Sector Wage Restraint

Budget-cutting political leaders regularly target the jobs and incomes of public sector workers as the first and most politically convenient target of their austerity measures. But their crusade to balance the books by downsizing headcounts, intensifying work, and freezing the pay of the workers who deliver essential public services can backfire. In this new report, Troy Henderson and Jim Stanford consider the unintended consequences of one prominent austerity measure: the cap on public sector wage increases that has been in place in New South Wales since 2011.

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Wage Suppression a Time Bomb in Superannuation System

The record-slow pace of wage growth in Australia’s economy is not just making it difficult for families to balance their budgets, it also threatens severe long-run damage to Australia’s superannuation retirement system.  That’s the finding of new research from the Centre for Future Work at the Australia Institute.

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June GDP Numbers Confirm Lopsided Economy

This week the ABS released new GDP data, covering the June quarter, which confirm the continuing structural shift away labour toward capital in the distribution of income.

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Senate Testimony on Cutting Penalty Rates

Our Director Jim Stanford was requested to testify before the Senate's Education and Employment References Committee on August 24, 2017 regarding the Fair Work Commission's decision to cut penalty rates for work on Sundays and public holidays in four major sectors of the economy: retail, hospitality, pharmacy, and fast food.

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New Research Symposium on Work in the "Gig Economy"

The informal work practices of the so-called “gig” economy are widening existing cracks in Australia’s system of labour regulations, and should be repaired through active measures to strengthen labour standards in digital businesses.  That is the conclusion of newly-published research from a special symposium on "Work in the Gig Economy," organised by the Centre for Future Work. 

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Australia's Precarious Labour Market: More Coverage

Public concern continues to grow regarding the erosion of traditional jobs, and the rise of more insecure, precarious positions -- including part-time, term-limited, labour hire, and independent contractor positions. The Centre for Future Work continues to research this phenomenon, and the policy measures which would help to improve standards in non-standard jobs, and encourage employers to create more secure positions. Recent media coverage has featured our research on these issues:

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The Future of Work is What We Make It

Progressives everywhere are grappling with developing policy proposals to improve the quantity and quality of work in our economy, as part of their broader vision for building more successful and inclusive societies. To this end, the Fabians Society in NSW recently published an interesting booklet of policy proposals, to inject into debate within the Labor Party and other fora. One chapter written by Sarah Kaine (Associate Professor at UTS and a member of the Centre for Future Work's Advisory Committee) and Jim Stanford (Economist and Director of the Centre) deals head-on with the challenges facing work, and what can be done to make it better; it is reprinted below.

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The Paradox of Rising Underemployment and Growing Hours

Paradoxically, underemployment and number of hours actually worked are both on the rise in Australia.

Dr. Anis Chowdhury, Associate of the Centre for Future Work, explains how these seemingly contradictory trends can coexist:

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Manufacturing: A Moment of Opportunity

In conjunction with the National Manufacturing Summit, titled "From Opportunity to Action," at Parliament House in Canberra on June 21, 2017, the Centre for Future Work has released a new research paper on the opportunities to sustain and expand manufacturing jobs in Australia.

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Record-Low Labour Compensation as Share GDP

Amidst increasing concerns among economists and budget forecasters about the historic stagnation of Australian wages, the latest GDP statistics from the Australian Bureau of Statistics have confirmed that the proportion of national economic output that is paid to workers has reached an all-time low.

New research from the Centre for Future Work at the Australia Institute confirms that total labour compensation (including wages, salaries, and super contributions) fell to just 46.2 percent of total national GDP in the March 2017 quarter.  That falls below the previous record low, 46.4 percent, dating back to 1959.

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