Five Contrarian Insights on the Future of Work

In this comprehensive but readable commentary, our Director Jim Stanford challenges five stereotypical claims that are often advanced in debates over the future of work:

  1. Work is not disappearing; it can't.
  2. Technology is not accelerating.
  3. "Gigs" aren't even new.
  4. Technology is often more about relationships than productivity.
  5. Skills are not a magic bullet.
Read more

Where To Now for Union Campaign? Workplace Express

The unexpected results of the 2019 Commonwealth election have sparked many commentaries regarding what happened, and why. This article, reprinted with permission from Workplace Express, considers the role of the major #ChangeTheRules campaign mobilised by Australian unions in the lead-up to the election - and ponders the movement's next steps in the continuing debate over labour market policies and industrial relations. It cites both our Economist Alison Pennington, and our Director Jim Stanford, as well as our previous research on the erosion of collective bargaining in Australia.

Workplace Express is Australia's leading labour policy and industrial relations newsletter. Please visit its website to subscribe.

Read more

Arena Magazine: For More Jobs and a Living Wage

The Australian policy journal Arena has published a wide-ranging article by Centre for Future Work Director Jim Stanford on the labour market issues at play in the current federal election.

Stanford argues that the sense of "superiority" which typically accompanies economic debates during Australian election campaigns is muted in the current contest, because of the poor performance of the labour market in recent years. Unemployment and especially underemployment remain high; the quality of work has deteriorated; and wages have experienced their weakest performance since the end of the Second World War.

Visit Arena's website to see the full article here.


124 Labour Policy Experts Call for Measures to Promote Stronger Wage Growth

124 labour policy experts have today published an open letter calling for proactive measures to help accelerate the rate of wages growth in Australia’s economy. The legal experts, economists, and other policy analysts agreed that “stronger wages in the future would contribute to a stronger, more balanced and fairer Australian economy,” and they proposed several broad strategies to boost wages.

 

The letter is being circulated today through internet and social media channels, and through a full-page advertisement in the Australian Financial Review.

 

Here is the letter and the list of signatories and their complete titles and affiliations.

 

Read more

Australia's Upside-Down Labour Market

Workers produce more, but get paid less.  Business invests less in real capital, but their profits grow.  Technology advances at breakneck pace, but so many jobs are degraded and menial (not to mention horribly paid).  What gives?  Australia's labour market truly seems "upside down."

In this article reprinted from Western Teacher magazine (published by the State School Teachers' Union of WA), our Director Jim Stanford tries to explain these contradictory trends.

Read more

Rebuilding Vocational Training in Australia

Australia's manufacturing sector has been experiencing an important and welcome rebound during the last two years. The turnaround has been documented and analysed in previous Centre for Future Work research (including studies published in 2017 and 2018 as part of the National Manufacturing Summit, co-sponsored by the Centre).

Ironically, the manufacturing recovery could be short-circuited by looming shortages of appropriately skilled workers.  This seems unbelievable -- given so much downsizing in manufacturing employment that occurred between 2001 and 2015.  But a combination of structural change within the sector, the ageing of the current workforce, and the failure of Australia's vocational education system (crippled by a bizarre experiment in publicly-subsidized private delivery) means that recovering manufacturers may be unable to find the skilled workers they need.

A recent feature article in Australian Welding magazine highlighted the Centre for Future Work's research into the problems of the current VET system, the implications for manufacturing, and 12 key reforms urgently needed to repair the situation.

Read more

New Video: Australia Needs a Pay Rise!

ANAPR Logo

Jim Stanford, Director of the Centre for Future Work, was recently featured in a new video produced in collaboration with United Voice and the Flip production company.

Read more

The Year Past, and the Year to Come

Workforce (a labour relations bulletin published by Thomson-Reuters) recently surveyed major IR figures in Australia on what they saw as the big issues in 2018, and what they expect as the major talking points for 2019. Jim Stanford, economist and Centre for Future Work director, was one of those surveyed, and here are his remarks. You may also view the interview in pdf format here.

Read more

The Future of Transportation Work: Special Series, WA Transport

A special 6-part series of short articles from WA Transport Magazine:

Researchers have identified the transportation industry as one of the sectors likely to be most affected by the coming implementation of new technologies: such as self-driving vehicles, artificial intelligence, and automated logistics systems. How will transportation workers fare as these technologies are rolled out, and what measures can be taken - by employers, governments, unions, educational institutions, and other stakeholders - to ease the transitions?

Read more

Australia's Precarious Labour Market: More Coverage

Public concern continues to grow regarding the erosion of traditional jobs, and the rise of more insecure, precarious positions -- including part-time, term-limited, labour hire, and independent contractor positions. The Centre for Future Work continues to research this phenomenon, and the policy measures which would help to improve standards in non-standard jobs, and encourage employers to create more secure positions. Recent media coverage has featured our research on these issues:

Read more


ACNC_Registered_Charity_Logo

get updates